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Tune-Up Anachronism
There are no more "tune-ups." Valves no longer need adjusting, ignition timing is computer controlled and there are no carburetors to fiddle with. About all that's left of the old tune-up drill are the spark plugs. These are often good for 100,000 miles, so don't change parts just to change parts. Instead, save up for those big 60,000- and 120,000-mile services when the timing belt, spark plug wires and coolant are due for replacement.

(source:editorial.autos.msn)

Wiper Tales
Here's a news flash: It's much easier to avoid hitting things you can see. Simple as it is, that's the concept behind replacing your windshield wipers before they fossilize into noisy uselessness.

Fall is the ideal wiper replacement time: after the blade-baking summer and before the fall and winter nastiness. Depending on location, wiper replacement may be an annual affair in the Southwest to a biannual chore in northern climes.


(source:editorial.autos.msn)

10 ways to motivate Our Child to Learn (5)

Posted by my-blogmedia | 2:26 AM | | 0 comments »

Hi readers.

Our children needs our help to really "open up the world of ideas," according to child psychologist Robin Forman, PhD. His renewed joy in discovery will transfer to his schoolwork, so you'll boost his academic achievement, too!. Here is the 10 tips to do it. We post it one by one. Enjoy.

Point out the new things you learn with enthusiasm.
Discuss the different ways you find new information, whether you're looking for gardening tips on the Internet or taking a night class in American literature. Let her see you in action: choose an activity that's unfamiliar to you both, such as playing tennis or speaking Spanish, and schedule a lesson or pick up a couple of instructional tapes. "Parents are the single most important modeling agent in a child's life," says Feinberg, and if you "demonstrate that learning is a lifetime adventure," your kids will get the message.

Wait for the next tip.

(source: lifestyle.msn)

10 Mistakes in Maintaining The Car (2)

Posted by my-blogmedia | 12:18 AM | , | 0 comments »

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for those ages 3 to 33, and nearly 80 percent of accidents result from driver distractions of just three seconds — like handing a child a sippy cup! Getting organized helps — you’ll spend less time searching for missing cell phones and dropped bottles and more time with your eyes on the road.

Feeling overconfident
Think it's mostly men who drive like maniacs? Think again. According to a University of Minnesota study, while women tend to say they're pretty tame drivers, once behind the wheel they drive just as aggressively as men.

Of course you want to be in charge while you drive, but cockiness can lead to accident-prone maneuvers, such as tailgating, blocking another car from your lane, and speeding. Be honest about your driving skills. Do you know evasive moves for avoiding an accident? If not, contact your state's department of motor vehicles for a list of approved defensive-driving courses — some of which you can take online. A bonus: Many insurers offer policy discounts if you complete the course.

(source: today.mnsbc)

10 Mistakes in Maintaining The Car (1)

Posted by my-blogmedia | 6:09 PM | , | 0 comments »

Proper Tire Inflation and Rotation
Tires leak naturally and need the occasional check. Figuratively speaking, underinflated tires suck up gasoline. Under- or overinflated tires wear out sooner, and deliver the same emergency maneuver handling as marshmallows. You probably aren't going to check tire pressures monthly, but how about twice a year?Furthermore, front and rear tires wear differently and should be rotated to even that wear. Your owner's manual will have a recommendation on both pressure and rotation periods.

(source:editorial.autos.msn)

10 Mistakes in Maintaining The Car (intro)

Posted by my-blogmedia | 2:14 PM | , | 1 comments »

Compared to the family trucksters of a generation ago, modern cars require about as much maintenance as a toaster. This is a real liberation from the oil, lube and tune merry-go-round that ruled not so long ago.

Curiously, many people haven't adjusted their thinking to keep pace with new car maintenance schedules. The preoccupied still run their daily drivers without service until the dash warning lights burn out, while over-achievers fret about running synthetic oil more than 2,500 miles without a change.

Although maintenance intervals are now more widely spaced, even the newest cars require scheduled service to live long, productive lives. Whether yours is the latest model or you paid it off years ago, the trick is giving your car the maintenance it was designed to receive.

Surprisingly, the answer to what maintenance is required is hiding no farther away than the glove box. Every car is supplied with a maintenance schedule — in the owner's manual or in a separate maintenance log book — that details that vehicle's needs. A few minutes assimilating these requirements will help you avoid the following common car-maintenance pitfalls.
See what are the mistakes in the next post.
(source: editorial.autos.msn)

7 Mistakes that Mom Does While Driving (1)

Posted by my-blogmedia | 7:54 AM | | 0 comments »

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for those ages 3 to 33, and nearly 80 percent of accidents result from driver distractions of just three seconds — like handing a child a sippy cup! Getting organized helps — you’ll spend less time searching for missing cell phones and dropped bottles and more time with your eyes on the road.

Chatting on your cell phone
It's tempting to use free minutes to arrange a playdate, but talking on your cell in a car is even worse than driving drunk. In a recent University of Utah study, the group using cell phones in a simulated environment had three accidents, while those who were inebriated had none. Why? Talking on a phone slows your reaction time (drunk drivers tend to be more aggressive, but they're not impaired the way cell-phone users are).

You're not off the hook if you use a headset. It doesn't matter how many hands you have on the wheel if you're not focused on the road. And while dialing a number is twice as dangerous as talking on the phone, we spend so little time dialing and so much time gabbing that they're equally risky, says Charlie Klauer, Ph.D., senior research associate at the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, in Blacksburg.

So:
  • Don't talk on your cell, unless you absolutely must.
  • If you need to make a call, keep it short. "The longer you're on the phone, the higher your risk goes up," says Klauer. A quick "Hey, I picked up some tacos and I'm on my way home," is okay. But "So I told her that I couldn't find the report, but she just walked away like she didn't even hear me, and then I was like, 'Well, I guess I'll have to write an e-mail to somebody's supervisor!' " is not.
  • When your phone rings, let the person leave a message, and call her back later. Or look for a safe spot to pull over so you can return the call.


(source: today.mnsbc)